To Gould, sound engineering and music production conveyed, as nothing else, “the spine-tingling awareness of some other human voice or persona.”

https://www.wired.com/story/microphones-music-screen-time-glenn-gould/?bxid=5fd38c00ecab7b663eb1c56d&cndid=63129747&esrc=register-page&source=EDT_WIR_NEWSLETTER_0_DAILY_ZZ&utm_brand=wired&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_mailing=WIR_Daily_061721&utm_medium=email&utm_source=nl&utm_term=list1_p2

Opinion: Although I am, or used to be a musician, I often wondered about the real functions of live performances. After all, if you enjoy music, the invention of music recording has made this activity redundant and obsolete. I came to realize that the real reason people went to live music performances was to commune with others, to share an event with people that like the same thing. Glen Gould was unique in that he did not care about money and once he recorded his most famous performance, never returned to the stage or the recording studio. Sadly, most musicians need both as a source of income to survive and produce more music, but many seem to enjoy public adulation and enjoy the excitement and unpredictability of playing live. I was not one of those musicians. I only worried about committing an error in front a large audience of strangers who expected perfection. Oh well, you can not have everything…